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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

6 edition of Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments found in the catalog.

Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments

Papers from the Ninth International Conference on Patristic Studies (Patristic Monograph)

by Robert C. Gregg

  • 174 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Wipf & Stock Publishers .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Christianity - History - General,
  • Religion - Church History

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages380
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8894713M
    ISBN 101597529613
    ISBN 109781597529617
    OCLC/WorldCa137696749

    Arius (Berber: Aryus; Ancient Greek: Ἄρειος, AD or –) was a Christian ascetic and presbyter of Libyan birth, possibly of Berber extraction, and priest in Alexandria, Egypt, of the church of the Baucalis. [1] His teachings about the nature of the Godhead, which emphasized the Father's divinity over the Son, [2] and his opposition to what would become the dominant Christology Arianism, in Christianity, the Christological position that Jesus, as the Son of God, was created by God. It was proposed early in the 4th century by Arius of Alexandria and was popular throughout much of the Eastern and Western Roman empires. It was denounced as a heresy by the Council of Nicaea in

    Arianism. Arianism falls under the category of Christological studies, or the doctrines of the Bible concerning Jesus Christ, the Son of God. Arianism holds to the belief that Jesus is God and is the Son of God because God created Him to be, so Jesus is thought to Arianism was a major theological movement in the Christian Roman Empire during the fourth and fifth centuries C.E. The conflict between Arianism and standard Trinitarian beliefs was the first major doctrinal battle in the Christian church after the legalization of Christianity by Emperor Constantine I. Named after an Alexandrian priest named Arius, Arianism spawned a great controversy that

    BOOK REVIEWS The Letters of St. Antony: Origenist Theology, Monastic Tradition and the Making of a Saint. By SAMUE RUBENSONL Bibliothec. a Historico-Ecclesiastica Ludensis Lund, Sweden: Lund University Press, pp. Saint Anthony of Egypt was the most celebrated Christian monk of the Arianism is a fourth‐century heresy, which affirmed Christ to be divine, but not in the same full sense in which God the Father is divine. Traditional Trinitarianism, with its classical expression in the Nicene Creed, emerged out of controversy with Arianism and defined Christ as being of one substance with the Father. The overall aim of the book is to trace when and where beliefs of an


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Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments by Robert C. Gregg Download PDF EPUB FB2

Start your review of Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments: Papers from the Ninth International Conference on Patristic Studies Write a review James marked it as to-read Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments [Robert Gregg] is 20% off every day at "Recent research has exposed difficulties in those interpretations of Arianism upon which we have long relied; old certainties have   Get this from a library.

Arianism: historical and theological reassessments: papers from the Ninth International Conference on Patristic Studies, September, Oxford, England. [Robert C Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments by Robert C Gregg,available at Book Depository with free delivery :// arianism, historical and theological reassessments.

papers from the ninth international conference on patristic studies, oxford, septemberthe philadelphia patristic foundation. Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments: Papers from the Ninth International Conference o - Robert C.

Gregg - 洋書の購入は楽天ブックスで。全品送料無料!購入毎に「楽天スーパーポイント」が貯まってお得!みんなのレビュー・感想も満載。 Arianism: historical and theological reassessments: papers from the Ninth International Conference on Patristic Studies, September, Oxford, England edited by Robert C.

Gregg (Patristic monograph series, no. 11) Philadelphia Patristic Foundation, Browse the entire 8,+ title book catalog of Wipf and Stock Publishers. All titles are 20% off every day at ://?cat=8&t_series=   name in use for the fourth-century theological conflict than "the Arian controversy." But Adolf MartiRittern,in a recent article on Arianism,4 draws some conclusions from modern studies of the early fourth century 2 Thes e points ar documented below.

3 See, e.g. AMonierAthanasiusder Grosse(MainzKupferberg: ) and Robert C. Gregg, ed. Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments. Cambridge, MA: Philadelphia Patristic Foundation, Robert C. Gregg, & Dennis E. Groh, "The centrality of soteriology in Early Arianism," Anglican Theological Review (): pdf [Reproduced by permission of the current copyright holder] This paper will thus draw from a sufficient body of historical and theological literature on Arianism, as well as look at the 'blasphemies of Arius' as they are reproduced in Hanson's The Search for the Christian God.

Before one turns to the doctrines of Arianism itself, however, some background into the historical and philosophical Archetypal Heresy: Arianism through the Centuries (Oxford: Clarendon Press, ). Williams, Rowan D. “The Quest of the Historical Thalia,” in Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments, edited by Robert C.

Gregg. (Philadelphia: The Philadelphia Patristic Foundation, )   Arianism was a 4th-century Christian heresy named for Arius (cc), a priest in Alexandria. Arius denied the full deity of the preexistent Son of God who became incarnate in Jesus Christ.

He held that the Son, while divine and like God ("of like substance"), was created by God as the agent through whom he created the   Bernard Green, Soteriology of Leo the Great, Oxford Theological Monographs (Oxford: Oxford University Press, ) Robert C.

Gregg, ed., Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments: Papers from the Ninth International Conference on Patristic Studies (; reprint: Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, ) paperback, $?sequence=1.

When in A.D.the Emperor Constantine ultimately convened the Council of Nicaea in modern day Turkey to settle the issue about Arianism. Over bishops from all over the world congregated to attend the first-ever ecumenical council.

Figure 5. Council of Nicaea, depicted in the book Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments. Editor and contributor (Papers from the Ninth International Conference on Patristic Studies, Oxford, ) Patristic Monograph Series, No.

11 North American Patristics Society, Wipf & Stock Publishers, reprint of edition Each of these modern pro-Arius scholars has produced a major work on the controversy: R.P.C. Hanson, The Search for the Christian Doctrine of God: The Arian controversy, (); Dennis Groh and Robert Gregg, Early Arianism: A View of Salvation (); Robert Gregg (ed.), Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments (   Arius (/ ə ˈ r aɪ ə s, ˈ ɛər i-/; Koinē Greek: Ἄρειος, Áreios; or –) was a Libyan presbyter and ascetic, and priest in Baucalis in Alexandria, Egypt.

His teachings about the nature of the Godhead in Christianity, which emphasized God the Father's uniqueness and Christ's subordination under the Father, and his opposition to what would become the dominant Christology There is a recent discussion of Asterius by Wiles, M.

F., in collaboration with Gregg, R. C.: ‘Asterius: a new chapter in the history of Arianism?’, in Gregg, R. (ed.), Arianism: historical and theological reassessments (Papers from the Ninth International Conference on Patristic Studies, Oxford ), Cambridge, Mass.

–51   The most complete collection of texts on Arianism I know of is listed on the FCC website, but they are Mostly letters from and to Arian of the texts have links in the translation column. The online book "Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments: Papers from The Ninth Century" contains source texts and commentary on the liturgy AFAICS from the search function:.

Librarian's tip: Chap. 5 "The Creation of 'Arianism': AD " Read preview Overview Theological Treatises on the Trinity By Marius Victorinus; Mary T.

Clark Catholic University of America Press, /religion/christianity/christian-beliefs-and-practices/arianism. beliefs within Arianism and their interpretations by “orthodox” groups varied widely, what remains significant are the discussions, responses, and theological inquiries that these beliefs led to, and the effect they had on theology in the history of the church.

One of the most important responses to Arianism came from Athanasius. ?article=&context=sot_papers.Arianism is an absolute form of monotheism which could not allow the possibility of the Son being God. The Son had to have a beginning and was created or made by the Father out of nothing.

Before this, the Son did not exist, and it is therefore incorrect for the Son to call God eternal ://